Search
  • Régia Estevam, YouthMappers Regional Ambassador

The Soybean, the Environmental Degradation and the Importance of Collaborative Mapping

Updated: Jun 14

Tradução em Portugués abaixo.


According to FAO data, Brazil is currently the largest soybean producer in the world. From the soybean, mainly oil and protein are produced. And, depending on the place you live, probably the soybean you consume is of Brazilian origin because Brazil is a major exporter of this legume. Only in 2020, Brazil produced about 126,00 million tons of soybeans (Figure 1), and it is expected to continue increasing its production until 2027. This is due to the high internal demand for protein bran to produce animal feed for livestock and the global increase in soybean consumption (OECD/FAO, 2018; CONAB, 2020; USDA, 2020). The Brazilian states that produce soybeans the most are Mato Grosso, Paraná, Goiás and Rio Grande do Sul.

Figure 1: Main soy producing countries. Source: USDA (2020).


But why am I talking about soybean production and what does this have to do with collaborative mapping? I'll explain it.

Well, the state of Goiás, located in the Midwest region of Brazil, responsible for 45.2% of Brazil's total soybean production (CONAB, 2020), it's where I was born and I spent practically my entire life until I moved to Portugal in 2013 to study my doctorate. I am a Geographer and researcher who develops studies on soil degradation and desertification. Since my graduation, I have focused my studies in the municipalities of Jataí and Serranópolis, located in the southwest of the state of Goiás/Brazil (Figure 2), which is a highly producing micro-region of soybeans, corn and beef.


Figure 2: Location of the municipalities of Jataí and Serranópolis, in the state of Goiás/Brazil.


While Jataí is a small agricultural municipality with an important participation in the national production of soybeans, Serranópolis is also a small municipality. Serranóplis' economic activities are concentrated, basically, in the creation of cattle for the production, mainly of meat for export. What these two Brazilian municipalities have in common, in addition to agricultural economic activities, is the fact that the soils are fragile and for many years have been considered inappropriate for agriculture.


Until the mid-1970s, the Midwest region of Brazil had a very low population density. Extensive pastures predominated, where they said that these lands only served for livestock activities. However, at that time, the federal government invested heavily to stimulate the occupation of this region by people from other regions of Brazil and thus improve the economic conditions that were considered archaic. There were many areas with deforested natural vegetation and several types of investments such as bank loans to purchase land, machinery and agricultural supplies. That's how, in Brazil, soybean production for large-scale exports began (Figure 3).


Figure 3: Soy cultivation in the municipality of Jataí, in the state of Goiás / Brazil. Year: 2019.


However, in the 1980s, the first marks of this intense exploitation of natural resources, such as soil, began to emerge. Both in the municipality of Jataí and Serranópolis, extensive degraded areas began to emerge, with sandy soil that can not produce anything. Locally, we often call these areas "areais" due to the similarity with the landscapes of beaches or deserts where large amounts of sand and reduced vegetation cover predominate (Figures 4 and 5). It's exactly this phenomenon I study.


Figure 4: Soil degradation in the municipality of Serranópolis, in the state of Goiás /Brazil. Year: 2016.

Figure 5: Soil degradation in the municipality of Jataí, in the state of Goiás/Brazil. Year: 2016.


The importance of collaborative mapping for scientific studies

In the doctorate, in the thesis research, I decided to test the methodology of the MEDALUS project authorship by Kosmas, Kirkby and Geeson (1999), which was a mapping method used to identify areas environmentally sensitive to desertification in mediterranean countries such as Portugal, Spain, Italy and Greece. However, these countries are much more evolved than Brazil in terms of infrastructure mapping. For example, to determine some soil quality indicators, information is required on infrastructures such as buildings, roads, streets, highways, natural preservation areas, mining mines, dams and agricultural barns.


But for my area of study, which was the municipalities of Jataí and Serranópolis, practically there was no such information (Figures 7 and 8). Also, I didn't have access to satellite images with a resolution that would allow me to identify and differentiate this information with greater accuracy of detail. I lived in Portugal, and since the Brazilian government financed me with a scholarship, I couldn't go to the field whenever I wanted to check mapping information. I was only allowed one fieldwork trip that lasted two months. I had to adapt the methodology to my reality at that time. But in me, it was anguish due to the lack of the necessary information to test the methodology in its original form without altering any data or information.


Figure 7: Image of the municipality of Jataí, in the state of Goiás/Brazil. Source: OpenStreetMap.

Figure 8: Image of the municipality of Serranópolis, in the state of Goiás/Brazil. Source: OpenStreetMap.


Only when I became part of YouthMappers, did I have direct contact with collaborative mapping. Because this is a topic that was not addressed in undergraduate courses in Geography in Brazil. Working at YouthMappers provides the opportunity to map the infrastructures of this entire agricultural region of Brazil to generate open geospatial data that can collaborate, not only for my research but with studies developed by other students and researchers who need this information for environmental impact studies. Local communities also benefit by using this data in urban issues, for example, mobility, accessibility, sanitation, flood risk areas, or green areas.


At first, it was pretty much me alone mapping, but I realize that other mappers are emerging. Although, slowly, I keep mapping everything I see in front of me. In this sense, collaborative mapping is of paramount importance not only for humanitarian actions to bring aid to communities suffering from natural disasters, outbreaks of diseases and civil or military conflicts, but also it assists the scientific community in developing research that contributes to society in general. That's why it's so important to map, and then I keep mapping.


REFERENCES

OECD/FAO (2018). OECD-FAO Agricultural Outlook 2018-2027, OECD Publishing, Paris/Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome. Disponível em:

https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/agriculture-and-food/oecd-fao-agricultural-outlook-2018-2027_agr_outlook-2018-en


CONAB - Companhia Nacional de Abastecimento (2021). Compêndio de Estudos Conab / Companhia Nacional de Abastecimento. – v. 22, Brasília: Conab, 2020. 22p.


KOSMAS, C.; KIRKBY, M.; GEESON, N. (1999). The MEDALUS Project: Mediterranean desertification and land use. Manual of Key indicators and mapping environmentally sensitive áreas to desertification. EUR 18882 EN, 88 pp. Office for Official Publicatios of the European Communites, Luxembourg.


USDA - United States Department of Agriculture (2020). Foreign Agricultural Service - Oilseeds and Products Update. Disponível em:

https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/5q47rn72z/cr56ns297/00000r529/production.pdf



Régia Estevam: Geographer and researcher with a doctorate in Geography and Territorial Planning, directed to the environment and natural resources, by Universidade Nova de Lisboa. Is passionate about Science, Nature and the issues of society, and tries to look at these issues through maps. Currently, is Regional Ambassador YouthMappers for Brazil.


A Soja, a Degradação Ambiental e a Importância do Mapeamento Colaborativo

De acordo com dados da FAO, atualmente, o Brasil é o maior produtor de soja do mundo. Da soja se produz, principalmente, óleo e proteína. E, dependendo do lugar que você vive, provavelmente a soja que você consome é de origem brasileira, pois o Brasil é um grande exportador dessa leguminosa. Somente no ano de 2020, o Brasil produziu cerca de 126,00 milhões de toneladas de soja (Figura 1), e a previsão é de que continue aumentando a sua produção até o ano de 2027. Isso é devido a elevada demanda interna por farelo proteico para produção de ração animal usada na pecuária e, também, pelo aumento global do consumo de soja (OECD/FAO, 2018; CONAB, 2020; USDA, 2020). Os estados brasileiros que mais produzem soja são Mato Grosso, Paraná, Goiás e Rio Grande do Sul.

Figura 1: Principais países produtores de soja. Fonte: USDA (2020).


Mas por que estou falando de produção de soja e o que isso tem a ver com mapeamento colaborativo? Já explico.

Bem, o estado de Goiás, localizado na região Centro-Oeste do Brasil, responsável por 45,2% da produção total de soja do Brasil (CONAB, 2020), é onde nasci e passei praticamente a minha vida toda até me mudar para Portugal, no ano de 2013, para cursar doutorado. Sou Geógrafa e pesquisadora que desenvolve estudos sobre degradação do solo e desertificação. Desde a minha graduação, tenho focado meus estudos nos municípios de Jataí e Serranópolis, localizados a Sudoeste do estado de Goiás/Brasil (Figura 2), que é uma microrregião altamente produtora de soja, milho e carne bovina.

Figura 2: Localização dos municípios de Jataí e Serranópolis, no estado de Goiás/Brasil.


Enquanto Jataí é um pequeno município agrícola com uma importante participação na produção nacional de soja, Serranópolis é também um município pequeno, porém com as suas atividades econômicas ainda concentradas, basicamente, na criação de gado bovino para produção, principalmente, de carne para exportação. O que esses dois municípios brasileiros têm em comum, para além das atividades econômicas agrícolas, é o fato dos solos serem frágeis e por muitos anos foram considerados inapropriados para a agricultura.


Até meados da década de 1970, a região Centro-Oeste do Brasil, possuía uma densidade demográfica muito baixa. Predominavam-se extensas pastagens, onde diziam que essas terras só serviam para atividades de pecuária. Entretanto, nessa época, o governo federal investiu pesado para estimular a ocupação dessa região por pessoas de outras regiões do Brasil e assim melhorar as condições econômicas que eram consideradas arcaicas. Foram muitas áreas com vegetação natural desmatadas, diversos tipos de investimentos como empréstimos de banco para compra de terras, maquinários e insumos agrícolas. Foi assim que, no Brasil, começou a produção de soja para exportação em larga escala (Figura 3).


Figura 3: Cultivo de soja no município de Jataí, no estado de Goiás/Brasil. Ano: 2019.


Contudo, na década de 1980 já começaram a surgir as primeiras marcas dessa exploração intensa dos recursos naturais como, por exemplo, o solo. Tanto, no município de Jataí quanto Serranópolis, começaram a surgirem extensas áreas degradadas, com solo arenoso em que nada se consegue produzir. Localmente, costumamos chamar essas áreas de “areais” devido a semelhança com as paisagens de praias ou desertos onde se predominam grandes quantidades de areia e reduzida cobertura vegetal (Figura 4). É exatamente esse fenômeno que estudo.


Figura 4: Degradação do solo no município de Serranópolis, no estado de Goiás/Brasil. Ano: 2016.

Figura 5: Degradação do solo no município de Jataí, no estado de Goiás/Brasil. Ano: 2016.


A importância do mapeamento colaborativo para estudos científicos

No doutorado, na pesquisa de tese, decidi testar a metodologia do projeto MEDALUS de autoria de Kosmas, Kirkby e Geeson (1999), que foi um método de mapeamento utilizado para identificação de áreas ambientalmente sensíveis à desertificação em países mediterrânicos como Portugal, Espanha, Itália e Grécia. No entanto, esses países são bem mais evoluídos que o Brasil em termos de mapeamentos de infraestruturas. Para determinar alguns indicadores de qualidade do solo, por exemplo, se exige informações sobre infraestruturas como edificações, estradas, ruas, rodovias, áreas de preservação natural, minas de exploração, barragens e celeiros agrícolas.


Mas, para a minha área de estudo, que foram os municípios de Jataí e Serranópolis, praticamente, não existiam essas informações (Figura 6 e 7), e também eu não tinha acesso a imagens de satélites com uma resolução que me permitisse identificar e diferenciar essas informações com um maior rigor de detalhes. Eu vivia em Portugal e, como estava sendo financiada com uma bolsa de estudos concedida pelo governo brasileiro, eu não poderia ir a campo sempre que quisesse para checar informações do mapeamento. Me foi permitido somente uma viagem de trabalho de campo que durou dois meses. Precisei adaptar a metodologia para a minha realidade naquela época, mas em mim ficou uma angústia devido à falta das informações necessárias para que eu pudesse testar a metodologia em sua forma original sem alterar nenhum dado ou informação.


Figura 6: Imagem do município de Jataí, no estado de Goiás/Brasil. Fonte: OpenStreetMap.

Figura 7: Imagem do município de Serranópolis, no estado de Goiás/Brasil. Fonte: OpenStreetMap.


Somente quando passei a fazer parte da YouthMappers é que tive contato direto com mapeamento colaborativo, pois esse é um tema que não é abordado nos cursos de graduação em Geografia no Brasil. Trabalhar na YouthMappers está sendo a oportunidade de mapear as infraestruturas de toda essa região agrícola do Brasil para gerar dados geoespaciais abertos que possam colaborar não só para as minhas pesquisas, mas com estudos desenvolvidos por outros estudantes e pesquisadores, que precisam dessas informações para estudos de impacto ambiental e, também, para beneficiar a comunidade local que poderá fazer uso desses dados seja em questões urbanas como, por exemplo, mobilidade, acessibilidade, saneamento básico, áreas de risco de inundação ou áreas verdes.


No início, era praticamente eu sozinha mapeando, mas percebo que estão surgindo outros mapeadores. Embora, de forma lenta, eu sigo mapeando tudo que vejo a minha frente. Neste sentido, o mapeamento colaborativo é de suma importância não apenas para as ações humanitárias levarem ajuda às comunidades que sofrem com problemas relacionados a desastres naturais, surtos de doenças e conflitos civis ou militares, mas também auxilia a comunidade científica no desenvolvimento de pesquisas que contribuem para a sociedade de forma geral. Por isso, é tão importante mapear, e assim eu sigo mapeando.


REFERÊNCIAS

OECD/FAO. (2018). OECD-FAO Agricultural Outlook 2018-2027, OECD Publishing, Paris/Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome. Disponível em:

https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/agriculture-and-food/oecd-fao-agricultural-outlook-2018-2027_agr_outlook-2018-en


CONAB - Companhia Nacional de Abastecimento. (2021). Compêndio de Estudos Conab / Companhia Nacional de Abastecimento. – v. 22, Brasília: Conab, 2020. 22p.


KOSMAS, C.; KIRKBY, M.; GEESON, N. (1999). The MEDALUS Project: Mediterranean desertification and land use. Manual of Key indicators and mapping environmentally sensitive áreas to desertification. EUR 18882 EN, 88p. Office for Official Publicatios of the European Communites, Luxembourg.


USDA - United States Department of Agriculture. (2020). Foreign Agricultural Service - Oilseeds and Products Update. Disponível em:

https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/5q47rn72z/cr56ns297/00000r529/production.pdf


Régia Estevam: Geógrafa e pesquisadora com um doutorado em Geografia e Planeamento do Territorial, direcionado para meio ambiente e recursos naturais, pela Universidade Nova de Lisboa. É apaixonada pela Ciência, pela Natureza e as questões da sociedade, e tenta olhar para essas questões através dos mapas. Atualmente, é Embaixadora Regional YouthMappers para o Brasil